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Man Arrested For Vandalizing Multiple Cars

street-2701004_1280-300x114A 34-year old Prince George’s County man was recently arrested for vandalizing five cars and taking property from at least three of them. The county police reported the arrest, and stated the defendant may be linked to vandalizing as many as 18 cars in a single 24-hour period. He is currently being held at the Prince George’s County detention center after a district court judge denied his release at a bail review hearing. Maryland judiciary case search lists the man as residing in Upper Marlboro, but this address may not have been current, which could have been a reason why he was denied bail. It also seems as if the defendant has been on the run for quite some time, as a violation of probation warrant was issued for his arrest back in 2010 in a Charles County case. He was on probation for felony first-degree burglary, and was given a 20-year suspended sentence with 5 years of probation in 2008. There are no other Maryland convictions in the man’s past, but he has been charged numerous times with crimes in PG County. All cases, including charges for arson, burglary, rouge and vagabond and theft) appear to have all been nolle prossed (dismissed by the state), leaving the Charles County case as his only prior conviction.

While this case may be confusing at first glance, it is important to realize that the defendant was not arrested for actually stealing the cars, but for stealing items out of the cars. The traditional legal term for breaking into cars is rouge and vagabond, but when items are actually stolen the police will charge the suspect with theft, and malicious destruction of property if there was damage to the car. Rogue and vagabond is essentially the Maryland version of burglary of a motor vehicle. The Maryland burglary laws only apply directly to breaking and entering homes (dwellings) and stores, and the yards or gardens of each. While rogue and vagabond is a misdemeanor that carries a 3-year maximum penalty, the penalty for stealing from a vehicle depends on what was actually stolen, and the amount of damage the person caused when breaking in to the vehicle.

Malicious destruction of property is always a misdemeanor, and carries a maximum penalty of 60 days in jail if the value of the damage caused was under $1,000, and 3 years in jail if the damage was over $1,000. Theft on the other hand can be a felony if the amount of the goods stolen exceeds $1,500. If the theft occurred over multiple days the state can charge based on the total amount of the entire theft scheme. The punishments for theft in Maryland were recently reduced by the Justice Reinvestment Act or JRA, and now the longest sentence for misdemeanor theft is 6 months as opposed to 18 months under the old law. The punishment for felony theft starts at 5 years and can go all the way up to 20 years for theft over $100,000.

The defendant in this particular case is not facing any felony charges, but he may face a harsh sentence due to his prior record and the fact that there were multiple victims. Regardless of what happens in Prince George’s County, the defendant may face a stiffer punishment if he in fact has been in violation status for his Charles County burglary case for the last 9 years. If so he will be transferred down to La Plata at the conclusion of his matters in the Upper Marlboro courthouse. The Blog will follow this case and may post an additional article if any newsworthy developments occur in the coming months. If you have been charged with theft, rogue and vagabond, burglary or malicious destruction of property anywhere in Maryland contact criminal lawyer Benjamin Herbst for a free consultation anytime at 410-207-2598. Benjamin is also an experienced automobile theft lawyer that handles unauthorized use of a motor vehicle and failure to return a rental vehicle as well.

Resources

Suspect Arrested For 18 Car Thefts In 24 Hours, PGPD Say, baltimore.cbslocal.com.